Oyster Flight

September truly kicks off the best time of the year for most southerners. Not only are we prepping for our SEC football tailgating ventures but we’re also getting ready to kick off oyster season. September 1 through April 30 is the prime time to partake in this delicacy of the ocean and I for one couldn’t be more ready! 

  Records of oyster consumption date back as far as 55 B.C., and their use in dishes have evolved and varied throughout history. From stews to fried to broiled to raw, the versatility of this mollusk is indeed limitless. I tend to be a more simple oyster consumer – all I require is a bottle of hot sauce and some saltines, normally. However, there are times when I just want to show out and create something magnificent with these salty morsels. I have three simple recipes that would make the perfect oyster flight for your next get together.

Oyster Shooter

Ingredients (Makes 4)
4 shucked oysters
3 chives, minced
4 tbsp vodka
8 tbsp cocktail sauce
4 shot glasses
1 thin lemon slice, cut into 4

Directions
1. In a shot glass, add 2 tablespoons of cocktail sauce.
2. Add 1 tablespoon of vodka on top of the sauce then gently place the oyster on top.
3. Garnish with chives on top of the oyster and a lemon slice on the rim of the shot glass.
4. Repeat steps with glasses. 

Pomegranate Oysters

Ingredients (Makes 4)
8 shucked oysters
4 tbsp pomegranate
black flakey lava salt
3 chives, minced 

Directions
1. In a mini serving bowl, add 2 oysters.
2. Top with 1 tablespoon of pomegranate, chives, and a little lava salt.
3. Repeat step in 3 other bowls. 

Fried Oyster

Ingredients (Makes 8)
16 oz canola oil
8 shucked oysters
flakey salt
1 tsp old bay
½ cup fish fry mix

Directions
1. In a small sauce pot, heat canola oil on medium high heat.
2. Season the oysters with old bay then lightly bread with the fish fry mix and shake the excess off.
3. Once the oil is at 350 degrees, drop the oysters into the hot oil.
4. Allow the oysters to cook for no more than 3 minutes or until the breading is lightly brown.
5. Top with flakey salt.

 Chelsea Gieselmann is a mom, photographer, columnist, food blogger, and home-cook. Cooking has been a passion of hers since she was old enough to cut out biscuits with the mouth of a mason jar. Her great-grandmother taught her the basics and she is ever so grateful to have been able to learn from her. Since then, she has honed in her craft a great deal and continues to. Instagram: @Southrngritskitchen

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